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dc.contributor.authorFolland, Sherman T.
dc.contributor.editorCole, Natalie B.
dc.coverage.temporal2010s
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-13T17:57:24Z
dc.date.available2020-05-13T17:57:24Z
dc.date.issued2010-01-01
dc.identifier.citationFolland, Sherman T. "When Lying Is the Ethical Thing to Do, And When There Is Too Much of It" Oakland Journal 18. (2010). 5-13en_US
dc.identifier.issn1529-4005
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10323/7871
dc.description.abstractMark Twain had little patience for purists who insisted that the slightest lie was an offense to God and would send you straight to Hell. Part I of this column relates the cautionary example of a Twain short story and adds two more examples, all designed to persuade doubters that lying provides important social benefits. Telling a lie often is the ethical thing to do. Part II considers socially unbeneficial lies and how much to tolerate them. Look into this part also for a sampling of the surprising research on the benefits of trust. The moral of the story, I think, is this: some dishonesty is good for us, while some bad dishonesty must be tolerated,but that is much less now that we know the importance of trust. Trust is uncanny.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherOakland Universityen_US
dc.relation.ispartofOakland Journal Number 18: Winter 2010en_US
dc.rightsCopyright held by Oakland Universityen_US
dc.subjectLyingen_US
dc.subjectTrusten_US
dc.subjectEthicsen_US
dc.titleWhen Lying Is the Ethical Thing to Do, And When There Is Too Much of Iten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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