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dc.contributor.advisorJohnson, Wendi
dc.contributor.authorMercer, Allison
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-06T15:44:11Z
dc.date.available2019-05-06T15:44:11Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10323/6736
dc.description.abstractThis thesis project aimed to discover new information regarding femicide reports in the media. A majority of young adults today stay up to date on current news through online sources, which is why understanding how media plays a pivotal role is shaping society’s perceptions. Drawing on feminist and rational choice theories, I examined three online sources from different political backgrounds to examine what key demographic terms were used to describe femicide and look for evidence of victim-blaming by using a mixed methods approach. Findings indicate the conservative source, The Washington Times, published two articles with indirect victim-blaming verbiage compared to zero found within the other two sources. As the media holds the power to influence viewers opinions, this research discusses how accurate reporting without bias can assist in bringing the social issue of femicide to the forefront.en_US
dc.subjectFemicideen_US
dc.subjectIntimate partner violenceen_US
dc.subjectDemographicsen_US
dc.subjectHomicideen_US
dc.titleFemicide Depictions in the Media: A Content Analysisen_US
dc.typeThesiseng


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