Show simple item record

dc.contributorMcCormack, Brian.
dc.contributor.editorStuart Henry
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-14T14:53:12Z
dc.date.available2017-03-14T14:53:12Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.citationMcCormack, Brian. "The Problem with Problem Solving." Issues in Integrative Studies 27 (2009): 17-34.
dc.identifier.issn1081-4760
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10323/4446
dc.description.abstractLittle has been written about the ontological nature of problems and problem solving in interdisciplinary studies, and yet problem solving is one of the central features of interdisciplinary theory and practice. This essay begins a discussion of how we might think about problems and how to solve them. Consideration is given to the objective, subjective, and constructed nature of problems, to Foucault's critique of problematization, Certeau's notion of everyday practices, and Deleuze's approach to problems, which involves the event. The problem with problem solving is its tendency not to wonder about what problem solving is, or what it might become if we just think about it.
dc.publisherAssociation for Interdisciplinary Studies
dc.relation.ispartofIssues in Interdisciplinary Studies
dc.titleThe Problem with Problem Solving


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record