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dc.contributorDenham, Scott
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-14T15:39:55Z
dc.date.available2016-03-14T15:39:55Z
dc.date.issued2000
dc.identifier.citationDenham, Scott. "Stories of Euthanasia in Germany." Issues in Integrative Studies 18 (2000): 7-25.
dc.identifier.issn1081-4760
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10323/4186
dc.description.abstractThe lived context of euthanasia under the Nazis is established through four brief narratives. The first two tell of the author's experience with a German farm family which hid a deaf mute during the war and with a silent building which turned out to have housed Joseph Mengele and his staff. The third narrative concerns Mengele's fascination with a Gypsy boy at Auschwitz and the fourth a film used to accustom German audiences to mercy-killing. A survey of key developments in the history of eugenics theory in Germany and the United States follows, and a thesis is developed that the same racial-purification impulses that drove German science during the 1930s and 1940s were present in American documents and legal proceedings.
dc.publisherAssociation for Interdisciplinary Studies
dc.relation.ispartofIssues in Interdisciplinary Studies
dc.titleStories of Euthanasia in Germany


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