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dc.contributorMurray, Thomas H.
dc.contributor.editorRaymond C. Miller
dc.contributor.editorJulie Thompson Klein
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-04T20:18:12Z
dc.date.available2016-02-04T20:18:12Z
dc.date.issued1986
dc.identifier.citationMurray, Thomas. "Confessions of an unconscious interdisciplinarian." Issues in Integrative Studies 4 (1986): 56-69.
dc.identifier.issn1081-4760
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10323/4019
dc.description.abstractThis is a cautionary tale, told by one whose venture into interdisciplinary work began with a social psychology experiment. Realizing there were moral dimensions to the experiment, he began following his interests across conventional boundaries. Ultimately, this led to studies of how people think about responsibility and, more recently, the ethical dilemmas faced by nurses and doctors who care for seriously ill newborns, an area that reaches far beyond the boundaries of moral philosophy into economics, sociology, and health policy. These experiences suggest that interdisciplinary theorists would do well to study what actually happens when people do interdisciplinary research. By creating and studying narratives about cases of interdisciplinary research, those who study interdisciplinarity will be able to temper abstract theory with experience.
dc.publisherAssociation for Interdisciplinary Studies
dc.relation.ispartofIssues in Interdisciplinary Studies
dc.titleConfessions of an Unconscious Interdisciplinarian


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