Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorPurcell, Dean
dc.contributor.authorDi Noto, Fara
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-12T17:10:36Z
dc.date.available2013-07-12T17:10:36Z
dc.date.issued2013-07-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10323/1778
dc.description.abstractThe brain is contralaterally organized, meaning the right hemisphere controls the left side of the body and the left hemisphere controls the right side of the body (Carlson, 2011). Handedness is highly correlated with hemisphere dominance such that it can be predicted that a right-handed individual has a dominant left hemisphere (Levy & Reid, 1978). Face recognition occurs in the right hemisphere of the brain (Reynolds & Jeeves, 1978), while face perception tends to occur in the left hemisphere (Benton, 1980). Yet, there has been no determination as to which hemisphere is specialized for face detection. Handedness also predicts which half of an image, either the right or the left, will be identified easier by an individual (Shuren, Greer, & Heilman, 1996). By comparing how fast and accurate individuals are at detecting faces in the right and left visual field against their degree of handedness and subsequent hemisphere dominance, this study seeks to discover where face detection occurs in the brain.en_US
dc.subjectFace Detectionen_US
dc.subjectFaceen_US
dc.subjectHandednessen_US
dc.subjectContralateral Organizationen_US
dc.subjectHemisphere Dominanceen_US
dc.titleThe Influence of Handedness in Face Detectionen_US
dc.typeThesiseng


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record