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dc.contributor.advisorZeigler-Hill, Virgil
dc.contributor.authorWoolston, Abigail
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-06T15:31:45Z
dc.date.available2019-05-06T15:31:45Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10323/6729
dc.description.abstractThis paper aims to investigate the associations that narcissistic admiration and narcissistic rivalry have with childbearing motivations. Participants in the study completed the Narcissistic Admiration and Rivalry Questionnaire, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and the Childbearing Motivations Scale. The results of this study show that narcissistic admiration had unique positive associations with all four positive childbearing motivation subscales. Narcissistic rivalry had a unique negative association with one positive childbearing motivation, as well as unique negative associations with four of the negative childbearing motivation subscales. Self-esteem had a positive association with one positive childbearing motivation subscale and negative associations with all five of the negative childbearing motivation subscales. The data suggests that individuals with high levels of narcissistic admiration are more likely to be motivated toward having children, whereas those individuals with high levels of narcissistic rivalry lean away from having children.en_US
dc.subjectNarcissismen_US
dc.subjectNarcissistic admirationen_US
dc.subjectNarcissistic rivalryen_US
dc.subjectChildbearing motivationsen_US
dc.titleThe Associations that Narcissistic Admiration and Narcissistic Rivalry Have with Childbearing Motivationsen_US
dc.typeThesiseng


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