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dc.contributor.advisorHowell, Sharon
dc.contributor.advisorShepherd, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorSheikh, Ameena
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-11T20:33:11Z
dc.date.available2013-06-11T20:33:11Z
dc.date.issued2013-06-11
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10323/1692
dc.description.abstractThree months ago I left my comfortable life in the swanky suburbs of Bloomfield Hills, Michigan to embark on a life-changing journey. This journey took me all the way to Fes, Morocco. With a ninety-eight percent Muslim population who predominantly speak Arabic and French, Morocco was nothing, absolutely nothing, like my home. As expected, before leaving I questioned how my identity would be altered by this experience. More specifically, how stereotyping and cognitive dissonance would impact my identity in this foreign country. Having a multi-cultural upbringing as both a Pakistani Muslim and Caucasian Christian, this auto-ethnographic study was extremely important because I have been deeply affected by this unique heritage and not always in a positive manner. I chose Morocco because it is a culture so different from anything I had ever known would shed light and give answers on how biracial people can create an identity that suite all situations without compromising any aspect of themselves.en_US
dc.subjectIdentityen_US
dc.subjectMuslimen_US
dc.subjectChristianityen_US
dc.subjectEthnographyen_US
dc.subjectMulti-racialen_US
dc.subjectJourneyen_US
dc.subjectIslamen_US
dc.subjectMoroccoen_US
dc.subjectTravelen_US
dc.subjectStereotypesen_US
dc.subjectDissonanceen_US
dc.titleDiscovering Ameena in Morocco: An Auto Ethnographic Study on Identityen_US
dc.typeThesiseng


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