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dc.contributor.advisorWynn Perdue, Sherry
dc.contributor.authorBrockway, Paige
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-18T18:21:31Z
dc.date.available2017-05-18T18:21:31Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10323/4568
dc.description.abstractRegard of the writer as stereotypically solitary, manic, driven by obsessions, or otherwise mentally disturbed is prevalent throughout history and popular culture. This study examines the professed truth behind this stereotype and interrogates the prevalence of depression, anxiety, and related mood disorders in self-proclaimed professional and/or recreational writers. Survey data was collected from 73 self-identified writers regarding their mental health, writing habits, creativity and productivity levels to identify how variations in mood affects a writer’s motivation and perceived ability to write. The goal of this paper is to provide greater insight into the minds of individual writers and to contribute a greater understanding of the link between creative-mindedness and psychological affliction.en_US
dc.subjectCreativityen_US
dc.subjectWritingen_US
dc.subjectMental healthen_US
dc.subjectDepressionen_US
dc.subjectManiaen_US
dc.subjectAnxietyen_US
dc.titleBleeding at the Typewriter: The Potential Link between Creativity and Mental Health in Writersen_US
dc.typeThesiseng


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