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dc.contributorLewis, Paul
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-14T15:39:55Z
dc.date.available2016-03-14T15:39:55Z
dc.date.issued2000
dc.identifier.citationLewis, Paul. "The Logic of Christian Theology and the "Right to Die"." Issues in Integrative Studies 18 (2000): 65-79.
dc.identifier.issn1081-4760
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10323/4189
dc.description.abstractThe logic of Christian faith challenges most of the claims made by those who affirm a right to die, including Nazi claims. Whereas right-to-die proponents view life as a possession with which we can do whatever we like, the Christian tradition treats life as a trust held on behalf of God. The purpose of life is not to serve our desires but to serve God. While the Christian tradition challenges the claim that all suffering is meaningless and needs to be ended, it urges compassion for those afflicted with undeserved and unexplainable sufferings, using Christ's participation in the human condition as its model.
dc.publisherAssociation for Interdisciplinary Studies
dc.relation.ispartofIssues in Interdisciplinary Studies
dc.titleThe Logic of Christian Theology and the "Right to Die"


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